France

The home of champagne itself, France is a country that is also synonymous with the finest of wines. Wine tasting tours and experiences in France will enable you to explore vineyards that are steeped in history, to sample deep glasses of Cotes du Rhone, delightful reds from the Loire, and full bodied Piqpoul de Pinet to name a few.

$
100
55
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
 (1)
Vines in the Marais?! Discover the green side of Paris' most popular fashion district and its secret vineyard in Paris. This hidden vineyard of the charming Joseph Mignaret garden ... morein the heart of the Marais district is a surprising discovery. The 'Marais', which means swamp, drained in the 12th century, primarily produced market vegetables, but there were vines here too. An extensive vineyard attached to the Hotel Royal Saint Pol produced wines in the Middle Ages, so the history of the vine here is as old as the quarter's history. 

Join us for this exceptional visit and explore another aspect of the role the vine still plays in the urban landscape. An exclusive wine tasting reflecting the flavors of the varietals planted here with a savory aperitif (delicious French nibbles) will complete this unique outing in Paris.
$
53
23
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
Wine your way through the Marais district of Paris and discover the Marais' secret vineyard on this highly original wine walk. Discover the hidden and charming vineyard of the Joseph ... moreMignaret garden in the heart of Le Marais district. The 'Marais', which means swamp, drained in the 12th century, primarily produced market vegetables, but there were also vines here as well. An extensive vineyard attached to the Hotel Royal Saint Pol produced wines in the Middle Ages, so the history of the vine here is as old as the quarter's history.

More information on Le Marais District 

Not so very long ago, the gentrified charms of the Marais were hidden by the more popular, working-class aspects of its melting pot cultural soup. Butchers, bakers, cheap cafés and restaurants, ‘zincs’ selling rough wines, tradesmen and a broad range of ethnic groups gave color to this still boisterous neighborhood.

The Marais today is renowned for its sophisticated mix of architecture, museums, fashion, contemporary art and fine dining. It is synonymous with historical Paris, culture and class and one of the most sought-after neighborhoods in the city. Though it was traditionally the Jewish quarter, it has also become home to Paris’ gay scene. A disproportionate number of artists, film and theatre people, gallery owners, fashion stylists, designers, architects and culturally savvy politicians have reclaimed the former mansions of the aristocracy and have raised rents so high, the traditional working-class residents can no longer afford to live there.

Join us for this exceptional visit and explore how the vine still plays an important role in this urban Parisian landscape. An exclusive wine tasting reflecting the flavors of the varietals planted here will complete this unique outing. 
$
112
38
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
Privately guided wine walk exploring the vineyard history of the Marais with off-beat historical anecdotes, natural wine tasting, and a French bistro lunch.... more

This hidden vineyard in Paris in Joseph Mignaret charming garden in the heart of the Marais is truly a surprising discovery. The 'Marais', which means swamp, drained in the 12th century, primarily produced market vegetables, but there were vines here too. An extensive vineyard attached to the Hotel Royal Saint Pol produced wines in the Middle Ages, so the history of the vine here is as old as the quarter's history. 

Join us for this exceptional visit and explore another the role these vines still play in this urban Parisian setting. An exclusive wine tasting reflecting the flavors of the varietals planted here with a wine-bar lunch to complete this unique outing.
$
53
23
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
The Jardin des Plantes is often missed by visitors to Paris, and yet this side of the Latin Quarter offers some of Paris' greatest treasures.... more

Left Bank history comes alive in this unique wine walk in Paris. One of Europe's oldest parks, the National Botanical Gardens of France was created in the 17th century on land that was used for mass graves during the plague. In 1635 it became the King's vegetable garden, which led to it becoming the focus of botanical research and the home to naturalists from around Europe.

The vineyard, planted with Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and Gamay, does not produce wine but provides a link with the earliest studies in ampelography as well as a scientific laboratory of viticultural study.

Join us for a walk through this unique haven of beauty in France paired with a varietal tasting of vines planted in the Jardin des Plantes in a local wine shop.

Vineyards in early Paris - Jardin des Plantes 
Paris grew up along the banks of the Seine and what is now the 5th was the epicenter of Roman Paris. The baths of Cluny and the Roman Arena off the rue Monge are among the vestiges of this period. In the Middle Ages, vineyards attached to the Abbeys of Notre Dame de Paris and Saint Germain des Prés flourished all along the left bank. The Montagne Saint Geneviève, upon which now sits the Pantheon, formed a large vineyard divided into ‘clos’ or enclosures, with streets still bearing their names (Clos Bruneau, Clos Garlande...)

The National Botanical Gardens
Transmitting a tradition... In the Jardin des Plantes, which has been open to the public for almost 400 years, the tremendous plant diversity in shapes, colors, and perfumes is the support for knowledge dissemination and preservation. The park welcomes you to a unique haven of beauty in France.

From generation to generation
When you tread the soil of the Jardin des Plantes, spare a thought for those before you... Though scientists and gardeners have shaped the garden, kings, queens, damsels, dandies, great ladies and turbulent children have admired the proud and protected nature of the only botanical garden in the capital, which is also classed as a historical monument. But one visit is not enough to discover all the secrets of a place that could become your favorite walk.

A research vineyard
There are 250 vines in the Ecological Garden of the Jardin des Plantes (planted in 2003), representing the 3 main grape varieties, Gamay, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir most commonly planted in the Ile de France. There are also a few French / American hybrid vines of Baco (a cross between Folle Blanche and Noah designed to resist phylloxera planted widely in Gascony for brandy production - Armagnac and Cognac) as well as Noah, derived from a Vitis Labrusca or Fox Grape. A moderately cold resistant varietal, Noah is used in wine production most notably for Uhudler (an Austrian wine) and Fragolino (a sparkling red Italian wine).

Philippe Barré, the gardener responsible for the vineyard, reminds us that the plateau of the Ile de France (the Paris region) was among the most viticulturally active areas of France. The objective here is not to produce wine, but to study the symbiotic relationships between the vines and the biodiversity around. For this reason, all ‘foreign’ plants are allowed to grow among the vines and the soil is worked superficially by mowing the diversity of plants growing between the rows. Insects are encouraged as they play determining roles in the health of the vines while others serve to control those that cause harm.

There are also a few wild vines that have been allowed to climb into the neighboring trees, which have now reached a length of several meters, reminding us that grape vines are creepers and when allowed to grow unchecked, will grow to amazing lengths.
$
112
38
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
From the vineyard of the National Botanical Gardens to the site of the Abbey Saint Victor, the Halles aux Vins, and the Roman Arena, this exceptional walk offers an enchanting vision ... moreof Paris.

The Jardin des Plantes is often unfortunately missed by many visitors coming to explore Paris, and yet this side of the Latin Quarter offers some of Paris' greatest treasures. Left Bank history comes alive in this unique wine walk. One of Europe's oldest parks, the National Botanical Gardens of France was created in the 17th century on land that was used for mass graves during the plague. In 1635 it became the King's vegetable garden, which led to it becoming the focus of botanical research and the home to naturalists from around Europe.

The vineyard, planted with Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and Gamay, does not produce wine but provides a link with the earliest studies in ampelography as well as a scientific laboratory of viticultural study.

In addition to an in-depth discussion of viticulture and a comprehensive historical background of the quarter, this walk includes a tasting of 2-3 organic and biodynamic wines and a delicious French bistro lunch.

Vineyards in early Paris - Jardin des Plantes
Paris grew up along the banks of the Seine and what is now the 5th was the epicenter of Roman Paris. The baths of Cluny and the Roman Arena off the rue Monge are among the vestiges of this period. In the Middle Ages, vineyards attached to the Abbeys of Notre Dame de Paris and Saint Germain des Prés flourished all along the left bank. The Montagne Saint Geneviève, upon which now sits the Pantheon, formed a large vineyard divided into ‘clos’ or enclosures, with streets still bearing their names (Clos Bruneau, Clos Garlande...)

The National Botanical Gardens
Transmitting a tradition... In the Jardin des Plantes, which has been open to the public for almost 400 years, the tremendous plant diversity in shapes, colors, and perfumes is the support for knowledge dissemination and preservation. The park welcomes you to a unique haven of beauty in France.

From generation to generation
When you tread the soil of the Jardin des Plantes, spare a thought for those before you... Though scientists and gardeners have shaped the garden, kings, queens, damsels, dandies, great ladies and turbulent children have admired the proud and protected nature of the only botanical garden in the capital, which is also classed as a historical monument. But one visit is not enough to discover all the secrets of a place that could become your favorite walk.

A research vineyard
There are 250 vines in the Ecological Garden of the Jardin des Plantes (planted in 2003), representing the 3 main grape varieties, Gamay, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir most commonly planted in the Ile de France. There are also a few French / American hybrid vines of Baco (a cross between Folle Blanche and Noah designed to resist phylloxera planted widely in Gascony for brandy production - Armagnac and Cognac) as well as Noah, derived from a Vitis Labrusca or Fox Grape. A moderately cold resistant varietal, Noah is used in wine production most notably for Uhudler (an Austrian wine) and Fragolino (a sparkling red Italian wine).

Philippe Barré, the gardener responsible for the vineyard, reminds us that the plateau of the Ile de France (the Paris region) was among the most viticulturally active areas of France. The objective here is not to produce wine, but to study the symbiotic relationships between the vines and the biodiversity around. For this reason, all ‘foreign’ plants are allowed to grow among the vines and the soil is worked superficially by mowing the diversity of plants growing between the rows. Insects are encouraged as they play determining roles in the health of the vines while others serve to control those that cause harm.

There are also a few wild vines that have been allowed to climb into the neighboring trees, which have now reached a length of several meters, reminding us that grape vines are creepers and when allowed to grow unchecked, will grow to amazing lengths.
$
100
55
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
This less visited side of the Latin Quarter was once covered in vines and host to Paris’ left bank wine depots. Join us for an in-depth discovery of its secrets, around glasses of ... moreliving wines and savory seasonal dishes.

The Jardin des Plantes is often missed by visitors to Paris, and yet this side of the Latin Quarter offers some of Paris' greatest treasures. Left Bank history comes alive in this unique wine walk. One of Europe's oldest parks, the National Botanical Gardens of France was created in the 17th century on land that was used for mass graves during the plague. In 1635 it became the King's vegetable garden, which led to it becoming the focus of botanical research and the home to naturalists from around Europe.

The vineyard planted with Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and Gamay, does not produce wine but provides a link with the earliest studies in ampelography as well as a scientific laboratory of viticultural study.

Join us for an in-depth discussion of viticulture and the quarter's vineyard history followed by natural wine tasting with small shared plates.

Vineyards in early Paris - Jardin des Plantes
Paris grew up along the banks of the Seine and what is now the 5th was the epicenter of Roman Paris. The baths of Cluny and the Roman Arena off the rue Monge are among the vestiges of this period. In the Middle Ages, vineyards attached to the Abbeys of Notre Dame de Paris and Saint Germain des Prés flourished all along the left bank. The Montagne Saint Geneviève, upon which now sits the Pantheon, formed a large vineyard divided into ‘clos’ or enclosures, with streets still bearing their names (Clos Bruneau, Clos Garlande...)

The National Botanical Gardens
Transmitting a tradition... In the Jardin des Plantes, which has been open to the public for almost 400 years, the tremendous plant diversity in shapes, colors, and perfumes is the support for knowledge dissemination and preservation. The park welcomes you to a unique haven of beauty in France.

From generation to generation
When you tread the soil of the Jardin des Plantes, spare a thought for those before you... Though scientists and gardeners have shaped the garden, kings, queens, damsels, dandies, great ladies and turbulent children have admired the proud and protected nature of the only botanical garden in the capital, which is also classed as a historical monument. But one visit is not enough to discover all the secrets of a place that could become your favorite walk.

A research vineyard
There are 250 vines in the Ecological Garden of the Jardin des Plantes (planted in 2003), representing the 3 main grape varieties, Gamay, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir most commonly planted in the Ile de France. There are also a few French / American hybrid vines of Baco (a cross between Folle Blanche and Noah designed to resist phylloxera planted widely in Gascony for brandy production - Armagnac and Cognac) as well as Noah, derived from a Vitis Labrusca or Fox Grape. A moderately cold resistant varietal, Noah is used in wine production most notably for Uhudler (an Austrian wine) and Fragolino (a sparkling red Italian wine).

Philippe Barré, the gardener responsible for the vineyard, reminds us that the plateau of the Ile de France (the Paris region) was among the most viticulturally active areas of France. The objective here is not to produce wine, but to study the symbiotic relationships between the vines and the biodiversity around. For this reason, all ‘foreign’ plants are allowed to grow among the vines and the soil is worked superficially by mowing the diversity of plants growing between the rows. Insects are encouraged as they play determining roles in the health of the vines while others serve to control those that cause harm.

There are also a few wild vines that have been allowed to climb into the neighboring trees, which have now reached a length of several meters, reminding us that grape vines are creepers and when allowed to grow unchecked, will grow to amazing lengths.
$
53
23
/ Person
Paris, Île-De-France, France
Duration:
4 H
Discover the vinous spirit of medieval Paris with this unique walk and French wine tasting.  This discreetly modest vineyard with its roots in the same soil that gave life to wines ... morein the Middle Ages, affords us the opportunity of sensing the spirit of place in one of Paris' oldest and most renowned quarters. 

Join us for an in-depth discussion around this medieval vineyard followed by a varietal wine tasting from these specific vines. 

Vineyards in the Middle Ages

The large Abbeys of Saint Germain des Prés, Saint Denis and Notre Dame de Paris possessed extensive vineyards situated on the Mont Valérien, the hills of Montmorency, Cormeilles en Parisis, Argenteuil, Vauréal, Andrésy as well as other communes.

The vines of the plots of Issy, Vaugirard, Meudon, Chatillon and Fontenay were under the jurisdiction of Saint Germain des Prés right up until the Revolution.

Paris' Smallest Vineyard

The Square Laurent Prache boasts Paris’ smallest vineyard. With only ten vines of Gamay from the Beaujolais village of Julienas, it can hardly be called a vineyard. But the modesty of the vineyard is more than compensated by the enthusiasm of its supporters.

Among the sponsors of 2007 of the “St Julienas des Prés” enclosure is notably John Simenon, the son of Georges Simenon, the famous French author who wrote the detective series with the commissioner Maigret. Yves Cambeborde, the French chef who inspired ‘bistronomy’ is also a supporter.

Julienas is one of the ten Beaujolais crus. Its fruity and lively wine comes from a black Gamay with white juice, still handpicked. It has good body and when grown naturally and vinified properly, can be kept from 5 to 8 years.
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